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Promoting Achievement through Technology and INstruction for all Students
Sep
01

Pure Bliss

Pure Bliss Girl with arms in the air and balloons flying in the sky.

bliss

Artist Name - Pure-Bliss.mp3

I recently witnessed someone accomplish something that he thought he would really never be able to do. To be transparent, neither did his sister and I at the time. Let me clarify why we had the low expectation. This had something to do with an old bike lock, a lost bike lock key, a need to unlock the bike, a YouTube channel discovering that the bike lock might have had a recall & how to pick the lock, and a Bic writing pen. 
bic

It took about 15 minutes, but after some sweat and nearly giving up…click! That old bike lock fell into two beautiful pieces and set free a bike that had been prisoner for weeks!

I remember the moment vividly. There was a 3 second silent pause, we all made eye contact and then immediately screamed with excitement at the top of our lungs. We jumped up and down, high-fived and shouted and repeated that multiple times.

We described that moment later as “an intense joyful cleanse that made any negativity escape and fulfill us with pure, joyful bliss!” Happiness. It set the whole tone for the day. Even though we were downtown in a busy city, we got the best parking spots, never had to wait in lines, everyone was so nice and got a seat right away in all the restaurants. We had an extra pep in our step the whole day. Was that because of our own attitude change?

As educators, we seek those moments of accomplishments with our students. We celebrate with them. We attend their sporting events, their academic competitions, and give positive reinforcement when opportunities present themselves. 

Along those lines, I would not trade anything to witness students celebrating themselves and discovering on their own what they just accomplished. No one telling them; just an organic realization of what they personally accomplished. 

It reminds me of a student when shown how the iPad can read text aloud from a picture taken. Then being told that he was running around the classroom shouting, “I never thought I’d be able to read what my friends are reading!” Happiness. Pure bliss.

I remember a 5th grader reading his first chapter by himself by using text to speech and comprehending  everything he read. He celebrated himself by throwing his arms in the air shouting, “I did it!” The look in his eyes…happiness. The tone and his attitude of his whole day was shifted into empowerment. Pure bliss. 
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The commonalities of those 2 stories of students is not only excitement and happiness; it is accessibility. It is accommodations. The equitable access with the use of text to speech, enabling those students to discover that they can read, empowering them, celebrating themselves and feeling really good. Not only in those moments, but opportunities given to them that can change the entire trajectory of their life. 

Think about moments when you have felt ecstatic! I know that when I reflect upon those moments of such high emotions, I can nearly experience it all over again. I can also relive moments when I want something so bad but it feels like it is out of my reach; but I know that I could do it if I just had the right tool, opportunity or even support from others. 

Consider your students who can comprehend everything when an adult reads text aloud to them; but when they are asked to independently decode, they struggle and it looks like they are just choosing to not do the work. Decoding is the barrier but when they are able to gain that knowledge with support, they have a lot to say and share. 

When it comes to some specific reading disabilities, to truly give students opportunities to discover what they are independently capable of doing and feel empowered, they need support, accessibility, and appropriate accommodations. They need to be given the opportunity without judgment and with acceptance. 

Remind your students to use their own strengths to support barriers that appear to be a weakness. The combination of those two working together…pure, joyful bliss. Happiness.
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Aug
11

Are You Prepared to Provide AEM (Accessible Educational Materials)? Ready! Set! GO!

By now most of us know that the 3 categories of a print disability specified by the IDEA are 1.) Vision Impaired, 2.) Physical Disability and 3.) Reading Disability, such as dyslexia. Since technology, teaching strategies, and universally designed classrooms make these disabilities navigable, I prefer to call them differences when possible. The first 2 typically are evident at birth, so the child will enter school with a good deal of documentation of their learning needs concerning the condition. 

The most frequently identified reading difference, dyslexia, is one of the most researched and documented conditions, affecting 20 percent of the population (1 in 5)  and represents 80-90 percent of all learning disabilities. 

Here in Indiana, Senate Enrolled Act No. 217 was signed into law in 2018, which requires Indiana schools to develop and implement specific measures regarding dyslexia. In response to that, the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) has written and posted several guiding documents to help schools and parents understand and meet the tenets of this law. 

As indicated in the guide entitled Dyslexia Programming Guidance for Schools a parent may request that the student receive a formal educational evaluation from the school. After the evaluation, if it is determined that the student requires special education services to successfully meet their educational needs, then the case conference committee (CCC) will assemble to determine if the student has a print disability, in this case, a reading disability. If the answer is yes, then the student requires accessible formats to access the curriculum. In the Individual Education Plan (IEP) a reading disability is indicated as an SLD (Specific Learning Disability) in the Area of Reading.

The following tips will guide you in serving students who have a documented print disability. Also, the Indiana Center for Accessible Materials (ICAM) staff has posted a guide to clarify the AEM  process for the CCC that explains DRM (Digital Rights Manager) and teacher tasks in detail.

  • With the new partnership between the ICAM and Bookshare, ICAM staff can search the Bookshare library and place those requests for you, if a needed title is not in the ICAM repository.
  • For the ICAM to fully support Indiana schools as they meet the AEM needs of their students, all students identified with a print disability must be registered in the ICAM.
  • The PATINS Project (Promoting Achievement through Technology and INstruction for all Students)/ICAM services are free to schools and grant-funded by the state. Therefore, by using the ICAM, schools are facilitating the provision of services to Indiana schools by adding to the data that PATINS presents to the state.
  • If you are a DRM, please copy/paste this DRM Badge into your electronic signature to identify yourself as a DRM. Also, enlarge the badge, print and hang it outside your door, then take every opportunity to explain to others about AEM, the PATINS Project (Promoting Achievement through Technology and INstruction for all Students)/ ICAM, and the IERC (Indiana Educational Resource Center). Becoming a DRM requires an appointment by a school's superintendent, or their designee, and training.
PATINS Project/ICAM Digital Rights Manager Badge
  • The IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) 2004 states that accessible materials must be available to qualified students in a "timely manner" which means at the same time their peers receive their learning materials.                                                                                                                                    
  • When to place orders: 
    • For VI orders of hard copy Braille and Large Print, orders should have been placed in April of this year. If you have received orders since then and for any future orders, enter those as soon as you get them. The IERC (Indiana Educational Resource Center) and the ICAM work very hard to help you meet "timely manner",  including for orders placed throughout the school year.
    • For orders of ePub and PDF from the ICAM repository, enter those as soon as possible so we can address unforeseen snags.
    • If you need a title from Bookshare and/or audiobooks from Mackin, you will order those through ICAM Web Ordering, as follows:
      • 1. As a DRM or teacher registered by a DRM, log into ICAM Web Ordering.
      • 2. Choose Make Special Request.
      • 3. Fill in all fields that have an asterisk*, indicate Bookshare or Mackin in the note field, and submit.
If you need assistance at any time, please contact the ICAM Staff. If you would like to become a DRM, we will support you every step of the way.

Thanks so much!
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